Storms Start Big in 2010

2010 sure has started off with bang-as far as storms go. Spring like "systems" have been impacting the southern plains the last few days, with January 20th being the prime day for severe weather. Many tornadoes have already been confirmed in eastern Texas, and then a few tornadoes the day after in Alabama. If this is a hint of what 2010 has to offer in the spring time, 2010 may very well be interesting. Certain discussions are saying El Nino may be the cause, and since I'm no climatologist, I suppose its entirely possible.


This is an absolutely incredible radar signature of a supercell on the LA, TX border on January 20. This cell produced an EF3 tornado, with a path length of 15.6 miles, and 3/4 mile wide. It also produced quite a bit of damage in, and around Waskom, TX.


Another storm on the same night as the one above produced an EF2 tornado near Canton, TX. It also appeared to be a prolific "hailer" storm, with GR2AE indicating 2.55" hail, which is calculated using an algorithm.


An isolated supercell developed just SW of Huntsville, AL, and continued its path NE eventually dropping an EF2 tornado over Huntsville. You can read more about the event, and see pictures of the tornado here:
http://www.srh.noaa.gov/hun/?n=january2010_severewx


Water vapor imagery of the storms on January 20th.


Lastly we have the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Index. This shows the sea surface temperature anomalies in the tropical eastern Pacific. Notice this years index resembles that of 2008. Not very high, but not low either. 2008 had some decent events, so we'll see how things go in 2010.